Places to Visit

Scott’s life and stories have a rich association with many places across Scotland and further afield. Explore some of those sites on our interactive map.

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Abbotsford
Melrose

Abbotsford is the extraordinary home of the 19th century novelist and Great Scott who popularised tartan, saved the Scottish banknote and rediscovered his country’s Crown Jewels.  

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Arbroath
Arbroath, Angus

This town, with its long sandy beaches and stunning sandstone cliffs, is thought to be the setting for Walter Scott's novel The Antiquary (1816).

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Bell Rock Lighthouse
Off the coast of Angus

Bell Rock Lighthouse, which lies off the coast of Angus, was visited by Sir Walter Scott in the summer of 1814.

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Cadzow Castle
Chatelherault Country Park, Hamilton ML3 7UE

In 1801, Walter Scott spent Christmas at Hamilton Palace and walked to the nearby ruins of Cadzow Castle. 

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Caerlaverock Castle
Castle Road End, Dumfries DG1 4RU

With its moat, twin-towered gatehouse and imposing battlements, this awe-inspiring castle is thought to have featured in Sir Walter Scott’s novel Guy Mannering (1815).

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Clovenfords Inn
1 Vine St, Clovenfords, Galashiels TD1 3LU

On being appointed Sherriff of Selkirkshire, Sir Walter Scott stayed at the Clovenfords Inn multiple times before purchasing his first home in the Borders.  

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College Wynd, Edinburgh Old Town

On 15th August 1771, Sir Walter Scott was born in a third-floor apartment on College Wynd in Edinburgh Old Town.

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Conisbrough Castle
Castle Hill, Conisbrough, Doncaster DN12 3BU

Sir Walter Scott embellished the ancient origins of Conisbrough Castle, one of South Yorkshire’s most notable landmarks, in his novel Ivanhoe.

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Crichton Castle
Pathhead, EH37 5XA

Walter Scott was a collector of histories, and stored up historic gossip about Scotland's nobility, and set part of his epic 1808 poem Marmion at Crichton Castle. 

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Dryburgh Abbey
Dryburgh, St Boswells, Roxburghshire, TD6 0RQ

In April 1826, Scott saw his wife, Charlotte, buried at Dryburgh. Six years later in 1832 he was laid to rest alongside her.

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Dunstaffnage Castle
Castle Grounds, Dunbeg, By Oban, Argyll, PA37 1PZ

Scott visited Dunstaffnage while sailing around Scotland in summer 1814.

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Dwarfie Stane
On Hoy, Orkney

Scott visited the Dwarfie Stane in August 1814. 

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Edinburgh Castle
The Esplanade, Edinburgh, EH1 2NG

Walter Scott describes the moment when he unearthed the Honours of Scotland.

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Elizabeth Gaskell's House
84 Plymouth Grove, Manchester, M13 9LW

Celebrating the life and literature of Elizabeth Gaskell, Manchesters most famous Victorian writer. A restored Victorian middle-class house just one mile from the city centre.

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Fast Castle
Eyemouth TD14 5TY

The ruined remains of Fast Castle, inspired Sir Walter Scott’s description of the fictional "Wolf's Crag", featured in his 1819 novel The Bride of Lammermoor.

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Flodden

Scott's poem, Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field, written by Scott and published in 1808, concludes with the story of one of the greatest disasters in Scottish history, the Battle of Flodden (1513).

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Fort Charlotte
Harbour St, Lerwick, Shetland ZE1 0JL

Scott visited Lerwick on his voyage around Scotland in 1814. 

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Glasgow Cathedral
Cathedral Precinct, Castle Street, Glasgow, G4 0QZ

Walter Scott gives a detailed description of Glasgow Cathedral in his epic novel, Rob Roy.

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Glen Shiel

Glen Shiel, a glen in the Northwest Highlands of Scotland which runs approximately 9 miles from south-east to north-east, features in Scott’s 1817 novel Rob Roy.

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Glencoe
Glencoe, Lochaber Geopark

Situated within the astonishingly beautiful Lochaber Geopark in the Highlands, Glencoe is the setting of Scott’s poignant poem “On the Massacre of Glencoe”.

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Hermitage Castle
Newcastleton, Roxburghshire, TD9 0LU

Scott visited Hermitage many times, excavating part of the castle, and having his portrait painted with it behind him.

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Historic Perth
Perth, Perth and Kinross

The events of Sir Walter Scott’s novel, The Fair Maid of Perth (1828), was set in and around historic Perth.

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Holyrood Abbey
Canongate, Edinburgh, EH8 8DX

Scott had a tirade against those who damaged Holyrood Abbey in November 1688.

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Holyrood Park
Queen's Drive, Edinburgh EH8 8HG

In 1820, Scott suggested unemployed weavers be put to work creating the Radical Road along Salisbury Crags.

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Inchmahome Priory
Boatshed, Port of Menteith, By Kippen, Stirling FK8 3RA

Inchmahome Prior is a monastic sanctuary situated in the centre of Lake of Menteith. Sir Walter Scott revived the island’s popularity in his romantic novel, A Legend of Montrose (1819).

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Iona Abbey
Isle of Iona, Argyll, PA76 6SQ

Scott visited Iona twice - once in 1810 and again, sailing round Scotland in 1814.

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Jarlshof Prehistoric and Norse Settlement
Sumburgh, Shetland, ZE3 9JN

In his novel The Pirate, Scott would go on to call the house ‘Jarlshof’, giving it the name we still use today. 

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Jedburgh Abbey
4/5 Abbey Bridgend, Jedburgh, Roxburghshire, TD8 6JQ

As well as being a writer, Scott was also a lawyer and pled his first case as an advocate in Jedburgh, right next to the abbey, in 1793.

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Kelso
Kelso, TD5 7HF

Kelso Heritage Trail

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Kinnaird Head Castle Lighthouse and the Museum of Scottish Lighthouses
Castle Terrace, Fraserburgh, AB43 9DU

Walter Scott portrays his view of the castle at Kinnaird Head from the Lighthouse Yacht at sea. 

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Library of Innerpeffray

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Linlithgow Palace
Kirkgate, Linlithgow, West Lothian, EH49 7AL

Walter Scott extolls the beauty of Linlithgow and its natural setting.

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Loch Coruisk
Isle of Skye

Popularised by Sir Walter Scott’s poem “The Lord of the Isles” (1815), Loch Coruisk is located at the very heart of the Cuillin Hills, on the Isle of Skye.

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Loch Katrine
Loch Katrine, Callander, FK17 8HZ

Loch Katrine, situated in the heart of Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park, was made famous by Sir Walter Scotts poem "The Lady of the Lake" (1810). 

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Lochranza Castle
Lochranza, northern coast of Arran

Walter Scott wrote lines on Lochranza in the early morning sun.

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Lovere, Accademia Tadini
Lovere, Palazzo dell’Accademia, via Tadini 40

Lovere

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Melrose Abbey
Abbey Street, Melrose, Roxburghshire, TD6 9LG

Walter Scott loved Melrose Abbey. His poem,The Lay of the Last Minstrel, brought many tourists to the site and work soon began to protect the ruins. 

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Mousa Broch
Island of Mousa, Shetland

A seasick Walter Scott wrote the poem, Mousa's Castled Coast, offshore from Mousa in 1814.

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National Museum of Scotland
Chambers Street, Edinburgh EH1 1JF

Home to Scotlands National Collections.

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North Castle Street
Edinburgh, EH2 3BG

After the birth of his second child, also named Walter, Scott moved his family into a house on 39 North Castle Street.

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Palace of Holyroodhouse
Palace of Holyroodhouse, The Royal Mile, Edinburgh, EH8 8DX

The Queen's official residence in Edinburgh and the home of Scottish royal history.

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Portobello sands

In the 1800s Portobello sands were used by the Edinburgh Light Horse Dragoons for drill practice, in which Walter Scott was their quartermaster.

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Rhymer’s Stone,
Melrose TD6 9HA

Rhymer’s stone is a monument to Thomas the Rhymer, protagonist of a well-known folktale and Scottish ballad which featured in Sir Walter Scott’s Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (1802).

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Rob Roy’s Cave
Loch Lomand, Inversnaid

Sir Walter Scott visited Rob Roy’s cave, the hiding spot for Scotland’s most famous outlaw, in 1817 in research for his novel of the same name. 

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Rothesay Castle
Castlehill Street, Rothesay, Isle of Bute, PA20 0DA

Walter Scotts tale, The Bluidy Stair, is of love, hate, and murder at Rothesay Castle.

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Scalloway Castle
Scalloway, Shetland

Visting Scalloway in 1814, Scott reflected on Earl Patrick Stewart's castle and his tyrannical rule over Shetland. 

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Scott's View
B6356, Melrose TD6 9DW

Scotts view is known to have been one of Sir Walter Scotts favourite places to reflect.

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Sir Walter Scott's Courtroom
26 Market Pl, Selkirk TD7 4BL

Sir Walter Scott’s Courtroom, which dates from 1804, is the building in which Scott sat as Sherriff of Selkirkshire for almost thirty years until his death in 1832.

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Smailholm Tower
Sandyknowe Farm, Kelso, TD5 7PG

Thoughts of Early Time represents Scotts childhood memories of playing around Smailholm Tower, and being inspired by Border ballads.

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Stirling Castle
Castle Wynd, Stirling, FK8 1EJ

Walter Scott describes King James V (disguised as James Fitz-James) riding to Stirling Castle in The Lady of the Lake.

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Stones of Stenness Circle and Henge
Mainland, Orkney

Walter Scott described the Stones of Stenness in August 1814, mere months before one of the stones was destroyed.

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Tantallon Castle
Near North Berwick, East Lothian, EH39 5PN

Scott's swirling description of Tantallon, in the 1808 poem Marmion, brought many tourists to see its wild, high vantage point over the sea.

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The Haining
The Haining House Selkirk TD7 5LR

The Haining Selkirk is home to the Old Ginger Dandie Dinmont Terrier statue.

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The Tibbie Shiels Inn
St Marys Loch, Innerleithen, TD7 5LH.

The Tibbie Shiels Inn, located between St Mary’s Loch and the Loch of Lowes, was a favourite of Sir Walter Scott and his great friend James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd.

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Threave Castle
Castle Douglas, Dumfries, DG7 1TJ

Walter Scott refelects on Scotland's turbulent past.

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Walter Scott Way
NT085052 - Moffat, Dumfries & Galloway

 Walter Scott Way is a 92 miles (148km) cross-country walking route of which there are numerous connections with Scott's life, literary career and legacy along its length.

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